Saturday, 30 August 2008

The Space Beneath the Church Out in The Willows

Some last minute news for August: the latest issue of The Willows is out, with my The Space Beneath the Church as one of the four featured stories. Space was an attempt to place a classic-style horror story into an uncharacterstic setting, the world of corporate business, and to consider how a Lovecraftian entity with God-like powers might really go about fitting itself into our modern world. It features creepy priests, gruesome subterranean vaults and a thoroughly nasty monster - and it probably explains the success of more than a few mega-corporations all too well.

It features creepy priests, gruesome subterranean vaults and a thoroughly nasty monster - and it probably explains the success of more than a few mega-corporations all too well.

At time of writing there's no obvious way to buy a copy on the website, but I'm sure that will be addressed over the next few days.

Tuesday, 19 August 2008

The Ascension of DeepRED Second OG's Spec Fic Sale

Another sale, and another repeat appearance: this time it's OG's Speculative Fiction, who were good enough to publish my The Other Ten Thousand last year. The new story, The Ascension of DeepRED, is a tale of a world-governing supercomputer and the man who thinks he can control it. No details as to a release date yet - as always, I'll post more news as I get it.

Monday, 11 August 2008

The Tyranny of Thangrind the Cruel for Dark Horizons, Exodus review

After the flurry of publications last month and based on the evidence of last year I was expecting this month to be deadly quiet, so it's particularly pleasing to announce another acceptance: Stephen Theaker, current guest editor of the British Fantasy Society's magazine Dark Horizons, has taken my The Tyranny of Thangrind the Cruel. It's deeply silly, and will hopefully drag forth the odd smile when it appears - in either next month's issue or the one after, depending on scheduling and the phases of the Martian moons. Current BFS members will get it for free, everyone else will have to join (which if you're British and into genre literature, you should probably do anyway) or miss out.

In the meantime, I'm keeping myself occupied with my copy of the Barren Worlds antho, which - based on the first five or so stories, at least - is proving a very strong collection. It reminds me of the kinds of anthologies that I grew up reading, and since those are the books that got me into sci-fi in the first place, that's high praise indeed. All biase aside, I sincerely hope it proves a success for Eric and Hadley Rille.

Lastly, I found the following review / summary of Exodus, as published in July's issue of Hub. Anyone who hasn't read the story may not want to read this since it gives away quite a lot of the ending, but I thought it was worth reproducing because it's an interesting interpretation, totally different from the one I intended but no less right for that:

"Adele, the hopeful widow in
David Tallerman’s “Exodus” (Hub # 57), has been selected to evacuate a dying Earth. The technology which will save her and hundreds of other people is incomprehensible to her. More than once, she calls it a miracle. And, indeed, it might as well be. In a variation of Clarke's Third Law, Tallerman’s story asks whether any miracle of transport, sufficiently advanced, is distinguishable from death. The gateway is a blinding white rectangle; prerecorded messages from an overhead speaker urge the evacuees to “go into the light.” Individuals vanish, one after the next. Who wouldn’t be apprehensive?"